From the January 2015 Issue

Beyond the Guidelines and Checklists

Beyond the Guidelines and Checklists

Guidelines from the American Veterinary Medical Association understandably take an objective approach to euthanasia: “When animals are plagued by disease that produces insurmountable suffering, it can be argued that continuing to live is worse for the animal than death ... The humane disposition is to act for the sake of the animal or its interests, because ... the animal will be relieved of an unbearable burden.”


Current Issue

Life-Saving Screening for Hemophilia

Advances in veterinary medicine and an increase in animal blood banks have improved the diagnosis and treatment of hemophilia to the extent that some cats who once would have died from the life-threatening disorder can now live full lives.

How Outwit Your Wily Escape Artist

You open the door for an unexpected visitor and your cat flees. It’s frustrating for you, potentially dangerous for your escape artist — and a possible sign that it’s time to add stimulation to his daily life. Cats adopted from a shelter may have been free roaming, with wide territories to explore, play and hide in. Now they’re confined at home to keep them safe from speeding cars and potential fights with stray cats and wildlife that can maim or kill, says Tracy Kroll, DVM, an animal behaviorist in Fair Lawn, N.J.

Short Takes: January 2015

In little more than a decade, changes have taken place in veterinary medicine to help prevent cats’ developing malignant tumors at the site of certain vaccinations. However, 22,000 cats in the U.S. still develop injection site-associated sarcomas (ISAS) every year, and the tumors are often more aggressive and prone to recurrence than spontaneous ones.

Ask Elizabeth: January 2015

My 12-year-old cat has hyperthyroidism. She cannot tolerate methimazole, and I have tried special food (she didn’t like it), homeopathic treatments, dietary additives and even consulted an animal psychic. Nothing has an effect, and I don’t want to put her through surgery or radioactive iodine therapy. They both sound horrible and also too expensive. Have we run out of options?

In The News: January 2015

In little more than a decade, changes have taken place in veterinary medicine to help prevent cats’ developing malignant tumors at the site of certain vaccinations. However, 22,000 cats in the U.S. still develop injection site-associated sarcomas (ISAS) every year, and the tumors are often more aggressive and prone to recurrence than spontaneous ones.