From the May 2016 Issue

How Tuxedo Cats Got Their Coats

How Tuxedo Cats Got Their Coats

The existing theory about the origin of piebald patches, the white patterns in the coats of black and white cats, was that pigment cells moved too slowly in the embryo to reach all parts of the body. Obesity continues to be a health problem in pets, judging by a recent report from Nationwide. The U.S. Postal Service will issue booklets of forever stamps offering a choice of 20 different pets sometime this year.

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Current Issue

Gallstones May Show No Signs

Cats don’t develop gallstones the way we do. Ours are made from cholesterol. Cats’ stones usually consist of calcium and a bile pigment called bilirubin. However, just as in people, cats can have gallstones without any symptoms or ill effects. Unless a cat has an X-ray or ultrasound for some reason, his owner might never know he had the disorder.

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How Tuxedo Cats Got Their Coats

The existing theory about the origin of piebald patches, the white patterns in the coats of black and white cats, was that pigment cells moved too slowly in the embryo to reach all parts of the body. Obesity continues to be a health problem in pets, judging by a recent report from Nationwide. The U.S. Postal Service will issue booklets of forever stamps offering a choice of 20 different pets sometime this year.

Click here to read more.

Wildlife's Biggest Threat to Cats

While warm weather brings out some wildlife, most creatures that could injure your cat in his fenced yard remain year-round threats. Cats typically will not engage them, but bats can swoop indoors and coyotes in a search of a meal can jump fences. Talk to your cat’s veterinarian about the risks in your area. The list of other species that can harm your cat throughout the U.S. is extensive, ranging from venomous snakes, foxes, raccoons and skunks to Great Horned Owls.

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Does My Cat Have Dementia?

Some cats develop cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS), similar to Alzheimer’s disease in humans. One-third of cats 11 to 14 years old have CDS, with the incidence rising to 50 percent for those 15 years and older.

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No Studies Support a Cure for Feline Leukemia Virus

Thank you for contacting us, and I am very sorry to hear about you kitty’s diagnosis. FeLV is a very common viral infection in cats, and while it is true that it often shortens the lifespan of infected cats (the average lifespan after diagnosis is approximately two-and-a-half years), it is important to note that infected cats can have a high quality of life for prolonged periods of time if they are managed appropriately.

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In the News: Kitten Kindergartens Trending at Shelters

A growing number of animal shelters and veterinary clinics around the country are offering kitten kindergartens in an innovative way to socialize kittens and increase their adoptability. Australian veterinary behaviorist Dr. Kersti Seksel developed the program about a decade ago.

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Download the Full May 2016 Issue PDF

Researchers at the Waltham Centre for Pet Nutrition in the U.K. have, for the first time, identified the bacteria associated with feline periodontitis. This condition, characterized by inflammation of the gums and other tissues, is estimated to affect two-thirds of cats over 3 years of age, causing pain, difficulty eating and tooth loss.

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