From the October 2016 Issue

Easily Missed Signs of Skin Cancer in Cats

Easily Missed Signs of Skin Cancer in Cats

These tumors are often diagnosed in their advanced stages because of the cat’s exceptional ability to hide signs of serious disease. However, new research and emerging targeted therapies have the potential to improve lives. The advances may be able to provide a better outcome to patients stricken with these cancers, says Cheryl Balkman, DVM, ACVIM, Senior Lecturer and Chief of Oncology at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine.

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Current Issue

How to Navigate a Second Opinion

When you bring a cat into your family, you make decisions in his best interest for food, litter and veterinary care. As your cat’s healthcare proxy, you’re also responsible for routine check-ups, dental health and vaccinations. Sometimes, however, you may need to make more difficult decisions, perhaps to seek a second opinion when the current treatment isn’t working.

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A New Report Says Healthy Aging Can Be Achievable

It’s now generally accepted that feline healthy aging is achievable just as it is in humans where the field of aging is dedicated to optimizing mental, social and physical well-being and function in older adults, the report says. “What has been less well defined, however, is what healthy aging actually looks like in a cat; in other words, what changes would be considered ‘normal for age’ … as opposed to deteriorative changes.”

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Don’t Ignore Extended Head Pressing

If your cat firmly presses his head against a wall or sofa for extended periods for no apparent reason, don’t be quick to dismiss it as attention seeking. He could be facing a significant health problem. “Head pressing is an abnormal behavior,” Dr. Kaplan says. “It should be considered an emergency, and veterinary attention should be sought immediately.”

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Considering Pet Sitting or Boarding?

Cats crave routine and seem to be in sync with your work schedule. But they know that the daily routine is about to be upended when they see you bring out the dreaded suitcase. Even though you look forward to a much-needed vacation, you may find yourself worrying about how your cat will fare during your absence.

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Ask Elizabeth: October 2016

Vomiting can be caused by many problems, ranging from obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract by hairballs or ingested string and other objects to metabolic diseases like kidney disease and hyperthyroidism, to inflammatory diseases like inflammatory bowel disease, to the ingestion of toxic substances such as plants, to cancer.

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A New Era in Medicine: Feline Genetic Screening

Complete genomes — genetic blueprints — of numerous cats’ DNA have been sequenced in what has been described as a new era in veterinary medicine. Cornell’s Veterinary Biobank, as one example, is a database of DNA and tissue samples from several species. The biobank is supported in part by the Cornell Feline Health Center.

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Easily Missed Signs of Skin Cancer in Cats

These tumors are often diagnosed in their advanced stages because of the cat’s exceptional ability to hide signs of serious disease. However, new research and emerging targeted therapies have the potential to improve lives. The advances may be able to provide a better outcome to patients stricken with these cancers, says Cheryl Balkman, DVM, ACVIM, Senior Lecturer and Chief of Oncology at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine.

Click here to read more.

Download the Full October 2016 Issue PDF

If your cat enjoys other pets, is even-tempered and not easily rattled by change, consider sending him to a boarding facility. The International Boarding and Pet Services Association, www.ibpsa.com, offers training and encourages members to cultivate strong relationships with local veterinarians, says Director Carmen Rustenbeck. She recommends choosing a facility with a trained staff who welcomes questions.

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