From the August 2016 Issue

Acupuncture for Cats Heads Mainstream

Acupuncture for Cats Heads Mainstream

Dusty was a black and white cat who hissed, swatted and squirmed anytime a veterinarian or technician tried to restrain her for an examination or, worse, tried to draw blood or give an injection. This same cat, however, transformed into a picture of serenity and calm during acupuncture treatments.

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Current Issue

In the News: Persians’ DNA May Hold Clue to Their Heart Disease

Winn Feline Foundation has awarded a grant for the evaluation of DNA variants associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, in Persians. HCM is the most common cardiac disease in cats. Previously, genetic mutations have been found in Maine Coons and Ragdolls, which led to genetic tests for screening before breeding.

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Guilty of These Mistakes in Training?

You’ve probably seen those clever cats on the Internet praying, rolling over and high fiving and wonder how they do that. All you want is for your cat to stay off the kitchen counter. It may come as a surprise, but you can train your cat to demonstrate a variety of behaviors. The biggest misconception people have about cats is assuming that they cannot be trained. They usually can if we avoid common mistakes in training.

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Acupuncture for Cats Heads Mainstream

Dusty was a black and white cat who hissed, swatted and squirmed anytime a veterinarian or technician tried to restrain her for an examination or, worse, tried to draw blood or give an injection. This same cat, however, transformed into a picture of serenity and calm during acupuncture treatments.

Click here to read more.

Treating Infectious Peritonitis; Cornell Study on Anesthesia

Feline infectious peritonitis, or FIP, a viral disease that is nearly 100 percent fatal, has been successfully treated in a research project at Kansas State University. Collaborators in diverse fields developed an antiviral compound for the feline coronavirus associated with FIP. Manuel Martin-Flores, MV, , ACVAA, of the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine will present preliminary results of his research on safer anesthesia for cats at the annual meeting of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia in September. Dr. Martin-Flores is one of only 220 anesthesiologists board-certified worldwide by the college.

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Claws Reveal Cats' Health Status

Cats depend on their claws to grip while climbing. They serve as weapons in a fight, hold their prey and release scent to declare ownership of your sofa. While many cats are fastidious about grooming, indoor kitties depend on their owners to keep their claws in top shape. They don’t do enough digging and scratching on abrasive objects to keep the claws short.

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One Challenge in Pancreatitis: The Lack of Definitive Signs

My cat has recently been diagnosed with pancreatitis. The veterinarian explained to me that it can be difficult to diagnose, but he feels confident that this is the correct diagnosis and has started treatment. My kitty is still not eating well, and I’m wondering if it is possible that something else is going on.

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Download the Full August 2016 Issue PDF

If you actually catch the cat in the act of inappropriately urinating or defecating, you can say “No!” However, a cat may not use the box because he is not feeling well. Medical causes should always be explored. For example, a bladder infection could cause him to connect its pain with using the litter box. Arthritis may prevent easy entry to the box.

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