From the April 2019 Issue

Cats Prefer to Work for Their Food

Cats Prefer to Work for Their Food

In January, we wrote about the recent American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) updated guidelines on feeding cats to make feeding programs more natural, emphasizing a cat’s natural desire to hunt. Hunting keeps the cat active, which burns calories and promotes a healthy body weight and lean muscle mass. These five things will help you make feeding time more like a hunt.

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Current Issue

Study on FCGS

A recent study led by Santiago Peralta, Cornell University School of Veterinary Medicine Assistant Professor, Section of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, found that feline chronic gingivostomatitis (FCGS)is more prevalent in shared households and its risk correlates with the number of cohabiting cats. Gingivostomatitis is marked by severe, chronic inflammation of a cat’s gums and oral mucosa. It’s most common in cats with certain viral diseases, like feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV).

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Mirtazapine for Liver Disease

Mirtazapine, a tricyclic depressant for humans, has been shown to have appetite stimulant benefits for cats. Since cats who have a decreased appetite can develop life-threatening conditions such as hepatic lipidosis, this medication can have important uses in cats.

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Acrylic Skull Piece Saves Tabby

Veterinarians at Washington State University used a 3D printer to manufacturer an acrylic skull for a cat needing surgery to address brain tumors, according to a report in the Moscow-Pullman Daily News. The cat, a tabby named Linus, had three tumors removed from the lining of his brain. After the removal of the first two tumors, Linus experienced brain swelling and bleeding, with his brain bulging out of the hole in his skull.

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Research Finds Two New Feline Viruses

An article in American Veterinarian says that researchers recently identified two novel viruses in the domestic cat: gammaherpesviruses and feline morbilliviruses. The Felis catus gammaherpesvirus 1 (FcaGHV1) was discovered in 2014, and feline morbillivirus was originally found in 2012.

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Dangerous Urethral Ruptures

In one large study, slightly over half of the cats that suffered from a urethral rupture had been subjected to direct and intense trauma, primarily by being hit by car and suffering from pelvic injuries. Just under half had experienced a partial rupture while being catheterized for a urinary blockage. Male cats are more commonly afflicted because they are more susceptible to urinary blockages, which may require catheterization, and are more likely to be outside, which increases risk of trauma.

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Feline Physical Rehabilitation

The days of hearing, “It’s just a cat,” are thankfully fading fast. Owners are increasingly more attuned to behavioral and physical changes in their cats that indicate injury or illness, and more enthusiastic about pursuing diagnostics and treatments to achieve the best possible outcome.

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What Emergency Clinics See Most

Emergency clinics and urgent-care after hours at regular veterinary clinics are on the rise for good reason: They save lives. But they are more expensive, and they don’t take appointments, which sometimes means a long wait. In March, we talked about common symptoms of serious illness in cats and when they warrant a veterinary emergency. In this issue, we discuss common metabolic and systemic diseases and when they constitute an emergency.

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