From the November 2017 Issue

Senior Cats Need Your Attention

Senior Cats Need Your Attention

We’re fortunate that many cats live well into their teens or even to 20 years of age or more. We generally define senior cats as any cat over 10 years of age. Geriatric cats can remain active and comfortable, but they are prone to certain health conditions. Being aware of these problems, reacting right away to changes, and providing recommended preventive care can all help keep your cat well into her later years.

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Current Issue

When Kitty Needs a New Home

Cats may find themselves in need of a new home for a variety of reasons: death of an owner, a change in the family’s situation, incompatibility with other pets in the household, or being caught as a stray. Just like us, most cats don’t like change, and transitions can be difficult.

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Short Takes: November 2017

Cats eat differently than we do. If given the opportunity, cats would consume seven to 20 small meals a day and would seek out the texture and protein found in a field mouse over the spongy texture and sweet taste found in a slice of cake.

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A Happy Cat Has A Working Nose

While cats don’t have the reputation dogs do for finding lost strangers or detecting bombs, they do have a finely tuned sense of smell. That sense of smell is important to both their health and their happiness. Cats have 200 million scent receptors in their nasal passages—people have about 5 million. The vomeronasal organ (sometimes called Jacobsen’s organ) on the roof of your cat’s mouth also aids in scent reception. If you see your cat curl his lip and lift his head while sniffing, that action helps to detect scent using this organ as well as through the nose.

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Prepare Now to Protect Your Cat in a Disaster

As we go to press, Hurricane Irma has strengthened to a Category 5 storm and is headed toward land, only a few days after we endured Hurricane Harvey, which destroyed its way into the record books. When it all settles, we’re pretty sure the losses involving pets will be quite sobering, possibly surpassing those of Hurricane Katrina, the disaster that showed us the inadequate preparations most of us make to safeguard our pets during a catastrophe.

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Hold the Carbs

In an effort to see what difference diet might make to an obese cat’s blood glucose control, researchers fed three diets—one high in carbohydrates, one high in fats, and one high in protein—to healthy-weight and obese cats and measured plasma levels of glucose, insulin, free fatty acids, and triglycerides. The study, published by BMC Veterinary Research, was done at the University of Zurich.

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Am I Too Old to Adopt a New Cat?

Q I’m alone and somewhat lonely, especially since Phoebe, my cat of 16 years, passed away a month ago. I miss her terribly. I have no children, just a couple of nieces I rarely see. My husband passed away a decade ago. I’m 83, but in good health. Is it right for me to adopt a cat at my age? I asked my veterinarian, but he said it was my decision. I would be happy to accept an older cat, because I realize it’s unlikely I would outlive a kitten. I wouldn’t want my new cat to fall on bad times because I passed away. Elizabeth, do you think I would be allowed to adopt?

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Download the Full November 2017 Issue PDF

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