From the March 2019 Issue

Catnip May Help With Cancer Drugs

Catnip May Help With Cancer Drugs

Researchers at John Innes Centre in Norwich, England, have learned how catnip produces the chemical that sends cats into a state of wanton abandon, and this information may apply to developing cancer treatments.

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Current Issue

Great Tree-Climber

According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution (AJC), Normer Adams, a retired social worker, is a “treed-cat rescuer on a rampage.” He rescues an average of one cat a week from trees. Over the last two years, that’s 91 cats. He doesn’t charge, and he has a YouTube channel (https://tinyurl.com/cattreerescue) where you can watch him rescue each cat. Some of the cats were in the tree for days. Once he reaches the cat, Adams places the cat in a bag to safely bring him back down the tree.

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5 Things Feline Food Facts You Need to Know

Diets must include nutrients that a cat cannot get elsewhere

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Implement a Simple, Safe Feline Diet

SmartBrief tells us that “Overweight, sedentary cats will lose weight if the size of their daily meals is gradually reduced, according to research published in the American Journal of Veterinary Research, and although there was no statistically significant change in activity, it’s possible some cats will become more active as the weight comes off.” The report says, “The researchers reduced the cats’ food consumption by 20 percent initially, then continued with regular reductions, and the cats in the study lost weight and experienced changes in their gastrointestinal bacteria.”

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Can’t Wait for an Ask Elizabeth Reply?

Our Elizabeth loves answering reader questions in her column every month, but she wants to be sure you know that Cornell’s Camuti Consultation Service also can help you out. The service puts you in contact with a Cornell veterinary consultant who will discuss your cat’s condition and/or care with you.

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Mammary Cancer Often Spreads

A mammary tumor, aka “breast cancer,” is the third most common type of cancer in cats. Generally, mammary cancer is found in cats 10 years of age and over and usually in females. However, Siamese and Persian cats have a higher risk compared to other breeds and may develop tumors at an earlier age.

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When Is It Time to Go to the ER?

We’re all grateful for veterinary emergency clinics, but we’d all rather avoid visiting one. They can be costly and frequently busy, just like any emergency room. Still, it is important to have the contact information for your local emergency/after-hours veterinary clinic at hand, so that if your feline needs rapid medical attention, you have a plan. These clinics are, quite literally, lifesavers.

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Bloodwork for Liver Problems

Liver (hepatic) diseases are common in cats, especially seniors. While clinical signs and symptoms are important (is your cat drinking more than usual or not eating?), bloodwork is the backbone of diagnosis. Usually, this will be several tests grouped as a small-animal liver (hepatic) function panel.

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