From the July 2018 Issue

Myth Buster: Canned vs. Dry Food

Myth Buster: Canned vs. Dry Food

We want the best for our cats, and nutrition plays a vital role in any animal’s health. But advertising and lay opinions can leave a cat owner wondering whether to feed canned food or dry foods.

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Current Issue

Weight-Loss Ointment

Things just got easier for cat owners everywhere. We now have an FDA-approved ointment that targets unintentional weight loss in cats.

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Your Cat’s Subtle Hind-Leg

The first signs of a hind-end problem can be subtle. You probably will not see an obvious limp. You might suddenly realize that you have not had to scold the cat off the counter in a week or more. Or you might notice that the first-floor litter box is “getting all the action” while the one up (or down) the stairs is pristine. These are often indications that your cat is experiencing some degree of arthritis, possibly even hip dysplasia (see also “Cats Hide Signs of Hip Dysplasia” from our May 2018 issue at catwatchnewsletter.com).

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Brushing Your Cat’s Teeth

Yes, you can teach your cat to let you brush her teeth! Choose a pet-friendly toothpaste in a flavor that your cat likes, such as tuna or chicken. Start by allowing her to lick the toothpaste off your finger or a toothbrush. Try to do this at the same time every day, such as when you brush your teeth, so it becomes a daily routine.

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Five Great Sources for Feline Health Information

Many unverified websites spout all kinds of feline health advice. We want to keep your kitties safe, so we are sharing our five favorites.

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Are Plastic Bowls a Problem?

You may have heard you shouldn’t use plastic bowls to feed your cat. Plastic bowls have been thought to cause facial pyoderma, or chin acne, in cats. Plastic allergies have been implicated in some skin problems in children, so it is not an unreasonable concern, but unfortunately there is no scientific data on this phenomenon in cats.

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Myriad Causes of Mouth Sores

An oral ulcer is almost always a reason to visit your veterinarian. While causes can range from treatable to serious, it can be difficult for you to determine at home. Your veterinarian may do a swab to examine under the microscope or possibly sedate your cat for a thorough oral examination.

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Have You Heard?

Your cat’s ears can get dirty for a variety of reasons: ear mites, bacterial infection, yeast infection, or just plain old wax buildup. Routinely check your cat’s ears to determine if she needs cleaning. Any chronically gross ears or ones that smell bad should be checked by your veterinarian, including having a swab checked out under a microscope to identify the cause of the problem. Regular ear cleaning, however, is something you should be able to tackle at home.

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